Andrew Kuo

Water Lilies

April 10 – May 15, 2021

Opening reception Saturday April 10, 11-6 pm

Press Release:

Broadway is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new chart paintings and loose, brushy abstractions by Andrew Kuo. Born in New York and raised by a dissident Taiwanese writer father and art historian mother, Kuo has lived an uncommon existence that melds the immigrant narrative, an intellectual milieu, and an All-American passion for pop culture and its discontents.

Kuo’s chart paintings combine an appetite for data with a refined graphic sense and sneakily complex chromatic approach. They harness statistics in the cause of emotional exploration with a sports fan’s zealous response to stats, and present them as programmatic diagrams that make sly reference to the Modernist canon. In this sense, these works are not abstractions, but instead are crammed with complex information that is detailed in a key that sits at the bottom of the painting. This text showcases Kuo’s knack for concise, Tweet-length expression that distills moments both quotidian as waiting for a friend—or as heavy as coping with Coronavirus quarantine.

In proximity to the charts, a reading of the accompanying gestural works is complicated by the implicit welter of content –despite the free-flowing explosion of color. A viewer gets the feeling that these carry coded messages for our pleasure-centers to decipher instead.

As one might expect of our atomized media moment, Kuo is also a published writer and info-graphicist as well as a celebrated podcaster and social media presence. These seemingly disparate modes of output are, in fact, tentacles of an integrated network that makes up his practice. Taken together, they begin to formulate a picture of our culture seen through the lenses of athletics, race, politics music, art, design and the Internet.

Andrea Marie Breiling
Eyes to the Wind
February 26 – April 3, 2021

Andrea Marie Breiling, For Golden Hands To Come Alive (A Miracle Is Happening), 2021, acrylic and spray paint on canvas, 83 x 73 in  (210.8 x 185.4 cm)

“These paintings beg for the return of miracles and hope. Not looking back at the dogma of life as we know it now—but to a brighter future full of endless possible possibilities. Each, for me, is a prayer.”

 

-Andrea Marie Breiling, Brooklyn 2/24/21

 

Andrea Marie Breiling’s large-scale paintings employ swooping bands of spray paint built up in fevered layers. Bristling with an evangelical fervor and a fierce commitment to improvisation and freedom, each painting acts as a document of extreme effort—both physical and emotional. Churned up like a storm, the compositions tend to pour forth from the relatively ordered logic of an axis or horizon, drenching the picture plane and creating a sublime depth of space and feeling.  Though based primarily in Los Angeles, Breiling made this cohesive body of work here in New York and the paintings reflect the influence of our weather, architecture (bridges in particular), and a bruised and moody aura that feels directly related to her deeply personal sensitivities to location and daily life.

Sensing our need in this moment, Breiling’s gestural communion with the canvas is her version of an escape, and an individualized expression of New York’s perseverance and hope. In her striving to find a more authentic conduit to a wider view, and the vantage of a higher plateau, Breiling has moved into some fertile new territory. The spiritualism of William Blake and El Greco—two manifesters of air and determined renderers of the Holy Spirit—is reverse-conjured from know-it-all cyberspace back onto reassuringly real supports using some Dick Blick approximation of their sacred pigments. In this way, Breiling evokes J.M.W. Turner lashed to the search engine to suffer atmospheric conditions of the exponentially more brutal algorithm. For example, with For Golden Hands to Come Alive (A Miracle is Happening) we feel the full force of the physical and psychic deluge of the painting’s creation as well as the hopeful glow of its fixed presence.

Ultimately, in the making, it’s Breiling’s present purity of feeling, a mannered expression of exertion (all painting is action painting!), a youthful clawing-out of a swirling pit of despair—and not any specious illusion of novelty or progression—that elevates the experience of viewing these works. The celestial ladder is presented for all to ascend at will, IRL.

Sarah Cain: In Nature is open now at The Momentary at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Sarah Cain, Installation view, The Momentary, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, 2021

Meg Lipke, Blue Eye , 2020, Acrylic and beeswax on canvas with polyester fill, 111 x 134 x 8 in

Broadway is pleased to announce the New York representation of Hudson Valley-based artist Meg Lipke. Taking a liberatory cue from touchstones such as the Supports/Surfaces movement, Sam Gilliam and Elizabeth Murray, Lipke’s canvas substrates are cut, sewn and tightly stuffed with polyester fill, yielding off-kilter forms that explode the bounds of painting’s persistent rectangle. These guts have the effect of humanizing the works, giving them evidence of gravity, sag and a slumping corporeal grace. Form and surface are martialed to upend the traditional relationship between painting and viewer, and the works become part stuffed-animal, upholstery, loved-object, or mattress. The canvas is used like a skin, and is treated to clusters of glyphs and bands of color that congregate in unruly configurations across curving and complex surfaces. The result is a combination of highly considered, deft craftsmanship mingled with a casual and improvisational chromatic sense.

Edie Fake, Still Life with Cracked Screen, 2021, gouache, ink and colored pencil on panel, 24 x 18 inches

Broadway is pleased to announce the New York representation of California artist Edie Fake. From intimately scaled works on paper in gouache and ink, to murals and immersive environments, Fake employs astonishingly realized and ornately patterned geometries of exuberant color in an allegorical exploration of queer, non-binary identity. Fake has been the subject of numerous institutional exhibitions, including solo projects currently on view at The Drawing Center, New York and the Berkeley Museum and Film Archive in Berkeley, CA. He will be featured in a forthcoming group exhibition at The Art Institute of Chicago. Fake has two new works in our current exhibition and will present a solo show at the gallery in December.

Broadway is pleased to announce the New York representation of New York-based sculptor Lars Fisk. Working in an astonishing array of materials and spanning scale from a water droplet to a locomotive, Fisk dramatically transforms everyday objects into engaging monuments of exceptional generosity to a viewer.

Sky Hopinka, Still from Here you are before the trees, 2020, HD video, stereo, color, 3-channel, synchronous loop

BROADWAY is pleased to announce New York representation of Sky Hopinka (b. 1984). Harnessing modes of filmmaking from feature-length non-fiction to skewed documentary, to poetic experimental reveries, the artist enlists image, language and music to explore the spectral conditions of Indigenous existence.

Hopinka’s solo exhibition Centers of Somewhere is on view through February 14th at The Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College.

Installation View, Grouper, Broadway Gallery, 2021

BROADWAY is pleased to announce the New York representation of Los Angeles-based artist Sarah Cain.

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In the unruly colors of her abstractions, Cain translates personal and collective experiences into a scintillating argument for a feminist perspective in the canon of painting. Draped, torn and tied, her paintings readily snap the picture plane beyond simple surfaces, often expanding into immersive installations.  The artist has upcoming solo exhibitions at The National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, The Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College, the Momentary at Crystal Bridges in Bentonville, Arkansas and a recent major public commission at the San Francisco International Airport. Her work will be included in an upcoming group show opening January 20th, 2021 and her first solo show at BROADWAY will open in September 2021.

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Meg Lipke

December 5 – January 16, 2021

Opening Saturday, December 5, 11-7 pm

Meg Lipke, Installation view, Broadway, 2020, photo by Pierre Le Hors

Press Release

Broadway is pleased to present a solo exhibition of recent paintings by Hudson Valley-based artist Meg Lipke. Operating at the edge of acrylic and canvas’ capabilities, Lipke takes painting out for an exhilarating walk in the expanded field. Ranging in scale from intimate to monumental, these disarming works engage the bodily effect of sculpture without sacrificing their firm footing in the traditions of painting, and its symbiosis with the wall.

Taking a liberatory cue from touchstones such as the Supports/Surfaces movement, Sam Gilliam and Elizabeth Murray, Lipke’s canvas substrates are cut, sewn and tightly stuffed with polyester fill, yielding off-kilter forms that explode the bounds of painting’s persistent rectangle. These guts have the effect of humanizing the works, giving them evidence of gravity, sag and a slumping corporeal grace. Form and surface are martialed to upend the traditional relationship between painting and viewer, and the works become part stuffed-animal, upholstery, loved-object, or mattress. The canvas is used like a skin, and is treated to clusters of glyphs and bands of color that congregate in unruly configurations across curving and complex surfaces. The result is a combination of highly considered, deft craftsmanship, mingled with a casual and improvisational chromatic sense.

Playing alternately with Rorschachian symmetry and destabilizing free-form compositions, and the surprising combination of Day-Glo and earthy pigments, Lipke throws caution to the wind. In this sense, the paintings feel as earnest as they do assured—the culmination of years of research and development and the inclination to follow her instincts into unfamiliar and fruitful territory.

Meg Lipke (b. 1969) received her BA from The University of Vermont with College Honors in Painting and Women’s Studies and her MFA in Painting from Cornell University.  Lipke’s work has been exhibited at Jeff Bailey Gallery, September Gallery, LMAK, Moore College of Art, TSA Philadelphia, Morgan Lehman and Gold Montclair. She has lectured extensively in universities and art programs across the country, most recently at MICA in Baltimore and The University of Buffalo in addition to Pratt Institute and Cornell University. Lipke is a 2020 recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Craft/Sculpture.  Her work has been featured in many publications, including Art in America, the New York Times and the Village Voice. Lipke lives and works in New York’s Hudson Valley.

Meg Lipke, Installation view, Broadway, 2020, photo by Pierre Le Hors

Meg Lipke, Purple Blob, 2020, Acrylic on muslin and faux silk with polyester fill, 33 x 40 x 4 in
Photo by Pierre Le Hors

 

Meg Lipke, Installation view, Broadway, 2020, photo by Pierre Le Hors

 

Meg Lipke, Big Side Guy, 2020, Acrylic on canvas with polyester fill, 64 x 98 x 13 in
Photo by Pierre Le Hors

 

Meg Lipke, Installation view, Broadway, 2020, photo by Pierre Le Hors

 

Meg Lipke, Rainbow Hanger, 2020, Acrylic and beeswax on muslin with polyester fill, 44 x 36 x 4 in
Photo by Pierre Le Hors

 

Meg Lipke, Black and White Vibrations, 2020, Acrylic on canvas with polyester fill, 132 x 104 x 13 in
Photo by Pierre Le Hors

 

Meg Lipke, Untitled (Teddy), 2020, Acrylic on canvas with polyester fill, 78 x 43 x 9 in
Photo by Pierre Le Hors

 

Meg Lipke, Installation view, Broadway, 2020, photo by Pierre Le Hors

 

 

 

Sky Hopinka, Installation view, Lore, Broadway, 2020

 

 

Sky Hopinka, Jáaji Approx, 2015, film still

 

 

Sky Hopinka, Kará! Listen! This is part of the source, these waters and these currents carrying canoes and the ancestors, new and old, 2020, inkjet with hand-scratched text

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sky Hopinka: Lore
October 10 – November 21, 2020

 

Opening Reception: Saturday, October 10, 11am-6pm
The artist will be present 4-6pm

 

 

 

For its inaugural exhibition, Broadway is pleased to present Lore, a solo show by artist and filmmaker Sky Hopinka. Centered around a 16mm looping film projection and including a suite of photographs hand-inscribed with related texts, the show succinctly encapsulates Hopinka’s ambitious and wide-ranging practice.  Harnessing modes of filmmaking from feature-length non-fiction to skewed documentary to poetic experimental reveries, the artist enlists image, music and language in penetrating the spectral condition of a perpetual afterlife that infuses contemporary Indigenous existence—and that this medium so effectively evokes in his hands.


Sky Hopinka, still from Lore, 2019. 16mm film, color, stereo, continuous loop. TRT 10:16. Courtesy of the Artist, Broadway, and The Green Gallery.

The titular film, which depicts the artist arranging and rearranging cut-up photographs on an illuminated overhead projector, takes its cue from Nostalgia (1971) the seminal experimental film by Hollis Frampton. In Frampton’s film, the narrator intones anecdotes relating to his artist friends and romantic entanglements as we watch photographs burn to ash atop a hotplate. With LoreHopinka dramatically expands on this format, pushing the voice and image connections further afield into the landscape and into a more complex and poetic personal narrative that engages performative collage in real-time. As the photographs accumulate on the overhead projector, we see and hear a band rehearsing a melancholy song that slowly builds into an insistent, casually beautiful version of Bo Didley’s Heart O Matic Love—added layers of specificity and broader raw emotion that intercut the artist’s oblique voiceover of a dissolving romance.

As a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation, and a fluent speaker of Chunk Wawa and active in Indigenous language revitalization, a consistent thread of translation, subtitling and multi-lingual voiceover runs through Hopinka’s practice as a whole. The slippage of meaning across these modes of expression, as well as the ways in which text and poetry (written, spoken and sung) remain in subtle friction with the imagery of the films and photographs is at the vital core of this work. The yearning incantations of the individual are overlapped with the specific political realities of a community and manifested with a strategy of presentation that straddles definitions of art, cinema and literature.

This exhibition is presented in collaboration with The Green Gallery, Milwaukee.

 

Sky Hopinka (b. 1984) received his BA from Portland State University in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. His work has played at various festivals including ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Images, Wavelengths, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, and Projections. His work was a part of the 2016 Wisconsin Triennial and the 2017 Whitney Biennial and the 2018 FRONT Triennial. He was a guest curator at the 2019 Whitney Biennial and was a part of Cosmopolis #2 at the Centre Pompidou. He was awarded jury prizes at the Onion City Film Festival, the More with Less Award at the 2016 Images Festival, the Tom Berman Award for Most Promising Filmmaker at the 54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, the New Cinema Award at the Berwick Film and Media Arts Festival and the Mary L. Nohl Fund Fellowship for Individual Artists in the Emerging artist category for 2018. He was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University in 2018- 2019 and Sundance Art of Nonfiction Fellow for 2019, and is 2020 Guggenheim Fellow. Sky Hopinka: Disfluencies is on view at the Minneapolis Institute of Art through November 15, 2020 and Sky Hopinka: Centers of Somewhere, organized by Lauren Cornell, opens October 17, 2020 at Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.


Sky Hopinka, still from Lore, 2019. 16mm film, color, stereo, continuous loop. TRT 10:16. Courtesy of the Artist, Broadway, and The Green Gallery.


Sky Hopinka, This is a certain body, 2019, inkjet with hand-scratched text, 13 x 13 inches, 33.02 x 33.02 cm, Edition of 3, 2AP’s


Sky Hopinka, This is the changer, 2019, inkjet with hand-scratched text, 13 x 13 inches, 33.02 x 33.02 cm, Edition of 3, 2AP’s


Sky Hopinka, Lore, 2019, 16 mm color film loop with sound, TRT 10:16, Edition of 3, 2 AP’s, Installation view

Sky Hopinka, Lore, 2019, 16 mm color film loop with sound, TRT 10:16, Edition of 3, 2 AP’s, film still


Sky Hopinka, Lore, 2019, 16 mm color film loop with sound, TRT 10:16, Edition of 3, 2 AP’s, film still