Meg Lipke

December 5 – January 16, 2021

Opening Saturday, December 5, 11-7 pm

Meg Lipke, Big Pink , 2020, Acrylic on canvas with polyester fill, 108 x 133 x 15 in

Broadway is pleased to present a solo exhibition of recent paintings by Hudson Valley-based artist Meg Lipke. Operating at the edge of acrylic and canvas’ capabilities, Lipke takes painting out for an exhilarating walk in the expanded field. Ranging in scale from intimate to monumental, these disarming works engage the bodily effect of sculpture without sacrificing their firm footing in the traditions of painting, and its symbiosis with the wall.

Taking a liberatory cue from touchstones such as the Supports/Surfaces movement, Sam Gilliam and Elizabeth Murray, Lipke’s canvas substrates are cut, sewn and tightly stuffed with polyester fill, yielding off-kilter forms that explode the bounds of painting’s persistent rectangle. These guts have the effect of humanizing the works, giving them evidence of gravity, sag and a slumping corporeal grace. Form and surface are martialed to upend the traditional relationship between painting and viewer, and the works become part stuffed-animal, upholstery, loved-object, or mattress. The canvas is used like a skin, and is treated to clusters of glyphs and bands of color that congregate in unruly configurations across curving and complex surfaces. The result is a combination of highly considered, deft craftsmanship, mingled with a casual and improvisational chromatic sense.

Playing alternately with Rorschachian symmetry and destabilizing free-form compositions, and the surprising combination of Day-Glo and earthy pigments, Lipke throws caution to the wind. In this sense, the paintings feel as earnest as they do assured—the culmination of years of research and development and the inclination to follow her instincts into unfamiliar and fruitful territory.

Meg Lipke (b. 1969) received her BA from The University of Vermont with College Honors in Painting and Women’s Studies and her MFA in Painting from Cornell University.  Lipke’s work has been exhibited at Jeff Bailey Gallery, September Gallery, LMAK, Moore College of Art, TSA Philadelphia, Morgan Lehman and Gold Montclair. She has lectured extensively in universities and art programs across the country, most recently at MICA in Baltimore and The University of Buffalo in addition to Pratt Institute and Cornell University. Lipke is a 2020 recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Craft/Sculpture.  Her work has been featured in many publications, including Art in America, the New York Times and the Village Voice. Lipke lives and works in New York’s Hudson Valley.

Sky Hopinka, Installation view, Lore, Broadway, 2020
Sky Hopinka, Jáaji Approx, 2015, film still
Sky Hopinka, Kará! Listen! This is part of the source, these waters and these currents carrying canoes and the ancestors, new and old, 2020, inkjet with hand-scratched text

Sky Hopinka: Lore
October 10 – November 21, 2020

Opening Reception: Saturday, October 10, 11am-6pm
The artist will be present 4-6pm

For its inaugural exhibition, Broadway is pleased to present Lore, a solo show by artist and filmmaker Sky Hopinka. Centered around a 16mm looping film projection and including a suite of photographs hand-inscribed with related texts, the show succinctly encapsulates Hopinka’s ambitious and wide-ranging practice.  Harnessing modes of filmmaking from feature-length non-fiction to skewed documentary to poetic experimental reveries, the artist enlists image, music and language in penetrating the spectral condition of a perpetual afterlife that infuses contemporary Indigenous existence—and that this medium so effectively evokes in his hands.


Sky Hopinka, still from Lore, 2019. 16mm film, color, stereo, continuous loop. TRT 10:16. Courtesy of the Artist, Broadway, and The Green Gallery.

The titular film, which depicts the artist arranging and rearranging cut-up photographs on an illuminated overhead projector, takes its cue from Nostalgia (1971) the seminal experimental film by Hollis Frampton. In Frampton’s film, the narrator intones anecdotes relating to his artist friends and romantic entanglements as we watch photographs burn to ash atop a hotplate. With LoreHopinka dramatically expands on this format, pushing the voice and image connections further afield into the landscape and into a more complex and poetic personal narrative that engages performative collage in real-time. As the photographs accumulate on the overhead projector, we see and hear a band rehearsing a melancholy song that slowly builds into an insistent, casually beautiful version of Bo Didley’s Heart O Matic Love—added layers of specificity and broader raw emotion that intercut the artist’s oblique voiceover of a dissolving romance.

As a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation, and a fluent speaker of Chunk Wawa and active in Indigenous language revitalization, a consistent thread of translation, subtitling and multi-lingual voiceover runs through Hopinka’s practice as a whole. The slippage of meaning across these modes of expression, as well as the ways in which text and poetry (written, spoken and sung) remain in subtle friction with the imagery of the films and photographs is at the vital core of this work. The yearning incantations of the individual are overlapped with the specific political realities of a community and manifested with a strategy of presentation that straddles definitions of art, cinema and literature.

This exhibition is presented in collaboration with The Green Gallery, Milwaukee.
Sky Hopinka (b. 1984) received his BA from Portland State University in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. His work has played at various festivals including ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Images, Wavelengths, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, and Projections. His work was a part of the 2016 Wisconsin Triennial and the 2017 Whitney Biennial and the 2018 FRONT Triennial. He was a guest curator at the 2019 Whitney Biennial and was a part of Cosmopolis #2 at the Centre Pompidou. He was awarded jury prizes at the Onion City Film Festival, the More with Less Award at the 2016 Images Festival, the Tom Berman Award for Most Promising Filmmaker at the 54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, the New Cinema Award at the Berwick Film and Media Arts Festival and the Mary L. Nohl Fund Fellowship for Individual Artists in the Emerging artist category for 2018. He was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University in 2018- 2019 and Sundance Art of Nonfiction Fellow for 2019, and is 2020 Guggenheim Fellow. Sky Hopinka: Disfluencies is on view at the Minneapolis Institute of Art through November 15, 2020 and Sky Hopinka: Centers of Somewhere, organized by Lauren Cornell, opens October 17, 2020 at Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.


Sky Hopinka, still from Lore, 2019. 16mm film, color, stereo, continuous loop. TRT 10:16. Courtesy of the Artist, Broadway, and The Green Gallery.






Sky Hopinka, This is a certain body, 2019, inkjet with hand-scratched text, 13 x 13 inches, 33.02 x 33.02 cm, Edition of 3, 2AP’s




Sky Hopinka, This is the changer, 2019, inkjet with hand-scratched text, 13 x 13 inches, 33.02 x 33.02 cm, Edition of 3, 2AP’s




Sky Hopinka, Lore, 2019, 16 mm color film loop with sound, TRT 10:16, Edition of 3, 2 AP’s, Installation view

Sky Hopinka, Lore, 2019, 16 mm color film loop with sound, TRT 10:16, Edition of 3, 2 AP’s, film still




Sky Hopinka, Lore, 2019, 16 mm color film loop with sound, TRT 10:16, Edition of 3, 2 AP’s, film still